1950

  Academic life:

WOI-TV, the first educationally owned and operated television station in the nation, goes on the air February 21.

Student life:

The ISC Dairy Products Squad won first place in all products, butter, and cheese divisions at an international students contest in Atlantic City.

Favorite food items in the Memorial Union:  baked ham, Swiss steak, meat loaf and cherry pie.  A typical meal:  roast pork and gravy, sweet potatoes, buttered spinach, apple-celery nut salad and boysenberry shortcake.

VEISHEA theme: "Mid-Century VEISHEA"

 

1951

  Academic life:

Iochief hybrid sweet corn, developed at ISC, was awarded a gold medal by the American Seed Trade Association.

Student life:

VEISHEA theme:  "The Education Fair"

  University:

WOI-TV transmitted its first local live studio production (March 5) and its first live agricultural program (March 9).

 

1952

  Academic life:

WOI-TV received the Sylvania award for the two series, "The Whole Town's Talking," and "In Our Care."

  Student life:

The first Greek Week was held.

 VEISHEA theme "VEISHEA—Spirit of Leadership"

1953

  Academic life:

Dr. Joseph P. Anderson donated his Alaskan plant collection to the Herbarium.

The first television course taught for credit was Psychology 204.

Athletics:

Meredith Willson writes a new Iowa State pep song, "For I – For S," based on many requests from alumni. The song is performed at Homecoming.

  Campus:

"Little Ankeny,"" a one story wooden shack, where over 2,000,000 pounds of uranium was produced for the World War II effort, was razed.

WOI-TV was granted increased power by the FCC, and moved to channel 5.

WOI-TV was awarded a Sylvania Television Award for its local programs, "The Whole Town's Talking," and "In our Care."

Iowa TV Schooltime ran at 10 a,m, everyday, and had an estimated viewership of 75,000.
 

Student life:

Registration totaled 8,000.

The livestock judging team won first place in swine judging at the International Livestock Exposition in Chicago.

The Women's Resident Association (WRA) was established.

VEISHEA Theme: "VEISHEA Highlights Progress."
 

  University:

James H. Hilton, Class of 1923, succeeded Charles E. Friley as president on July 1.

James H. Jensen, head of the Department of Plant Pathology at North Carolina State College was appointed Iowa State's first provost on November 1.
 

1954

  Academic life:

The first Faculty Council was elected.

Athletics:

Cy the Cardinal became Iowa State's mascot.

Student life:

The first couple was married in the Memorial Union chapel.

Fees were raised to $66 for the quarter.

VEISHEA theme: "Showcase of Achievement."
 

  University:

The Alumni Association transferred its alumni information to 60,000 IBM cards.

The Forestry Department celebrated its 50th anniversary.
 

1955

 Academic life:

The State Board of Education became the State Board of Regents.

Athletics:

Chuck Duncan scored 438 points for a 1-year record and career total of 901 points in basketball.

The Cyclone football coaches selected the student body as its "athlete of the week."

  Campus:

Westgate Dormitory built for 222,887, was constructed of pre-cast concrete panels. It was torn down in 2004.

Student life:

VEISHEA theme: Cavalcade of Education

1956

  Academic life:

Browsing library established in the Memorial Union.

 Athletics:

The Cyclones won the Big 7 basketball title, with Gary Thompson named the tournament's "most spectacular player." Thompson was also named to the All Big Seven basketball team by the AP and UP and named athlete of the year for Iowa State.

Baseball team won a conference title, district title, and their first collegiate World Series appearance.
 

 Campus:

Contractors began work on the addition to the Memorial Union, adding the bookstore and the Sun Room.

13 New bells for the carillon (already with 36 bells), imported from the John Taylor and Company Foundry in England.
 

 Student life:

Hawthorn Apartments, Pammel Court, were opened to married students.

VEISHEA theme: 'VEISHEA Reflects Education"
 

 University:

Ames was chosen as the site of the U.S. Animal Disease Laboratory.

1957

Student life:

VEISHEA theme: "Insight of your Future"
 

1958

  Academic life:

W. Robert Parks was appointed to the newly established position of Dean of Instruction. He came to Iowa State from the University of Wisconsin, but had also served as Professor in the Dept. of History and Government at Iowa State from 1948-1956.

The Division of Home Economics discontinued the tradition of infant care in the home management house (1924-1958).

The faculty voted to continue the quarter system (1919- ).
 

 Athletics:

Cyclone wrestlers won the Big Eight Tournament, and placed second nationally.

 Campus:

The book store moved into the Memorial Union.

Home Economics Hall was named for Catherine J. MacKay Hall.

Street signs are installed on campus.
 

 University:

The position of Vice President for Business and Finance was established.

President Emeritus Charles E. Friley died on July 11. He was president of Iowa State from 1936 through 1953.

President Emeritus Raymond M. Hughes died on September 22. He was president from 1927 through 1936.

The centennial of the university was celebrated with the following events:
Founders Day (March 22)
Academic Symposia (March 22-23)
VEISHEA (May 15-17)
Commencement (June 13-15)

The theme was "with honor to the past….with vision for the future."

In Alaska, Mt. Anderson and Gilkey Glacier were named for two Iowa State alumni. Jacob Peter Anderson (Class of 1913), a member of the botany faculty from 1941 through 1953, did extensive botanical research in Alaskan flora. Arthur Karr Gilkey (Class of 1949) led the first party to explore the head of the glacier. He was killed by an ice avalance on K-2 in 1953.

The Iowa State College Foundation is formed, with the express goal of raising funds for what will become the Iowa State Center (C.Y. Stephens Auditorium, the Scheman Center, Fisher Theater, and Hilton Coliseum).
 

1959

 Academic life:

A History of Civil Engineering at Iowa State, was published by Professor A.H. Fuller.

 Campus:

Nearly 30,000 tons of silt were dredged from Lake LaVerne.

 Student life:

The Hub, a vending area for students, staff, and faculty, was built in a portion of the area formerly occupied by the College Book Store in the Post Office Building.

 

 University:

On July 4, Iowa State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts became Iowa State University of Science and Technology.

At the March 12-13 meeting of the State Board of Regents, approval was given for the change of name of the divisions of Iowa State. As of July 1, the official names were the College of Agriculture, College of Engineering, College of Home Economics, College of Sciences and Humanities, and College of Veterinary Medicine.

The Civil Engineering Summer Camp program was discontinued. Started by Professor Anson Marston in 1899.

CYCLONE, a high-speed digital computer was completed and put into operation.

Nikita Khrushchev, premier of the U.S.S.R., visits the ISU campus and the Coon Rapids farm of ISU alumnus Roswell Garst.

Pammel Drive was paved from the ISU Cemetery to Hyland Avenue.

The Iowa State Golf Course was renamed in honor of George F. Veenker

 

1960

  Academic life:

The Department of Nuclear Engineering was established.

The Board of Regents authorized major work for undergraduates in the fields of English and Speech, Modern (Foreign) Languages, and Physical Education for Women.

The College of Home Economics (with funding from the Ford Foundation) establishes a cooperative agreement with Baroda University in India to assist in the development of their graduate and research programs in home economics.

  Student life:

The Green Gander discontinued publication (1915-1960)

ISU initiates the University Honors Program, attracting 40 students in its first year.

  University:

History of Cooperative Agriculture and Home Economics Extension in Iowa was published by Prof. R.K. Bliss.

The last team of Iowa State draft horses was sold.
 

1961

  Academic life:

W. Robert Parks is named Vice President for Academic Affairs and Virgil Lagomarcino is named director of teacher education at Iowa State.
 

  Athletics:

Clyde Williams Field is expanded to seat 25,000.

  Campus:

The first addition to the Library is completed (with air conditioning).

Planning begins for the Iowa State Center, and C.Y. Stephens is designated the national chairman of the fundraising campaign.


  Student life:

A proposal to allow telephones in dormitory rooms is met with resistance and concern that phones are an "unnecessary frill." The Board of Regents delays temporarily, but following student presentations in the spring, telephones are installed by fall.

  University:

The National Animal Disease Laboratory opens in May.

 

1962

  Academic life:

Carl Hamilton (Class of 1936), editor of the Iowa Falls Citizen and Hardin County Times (since 1948) is appointed head of the Department of Technical Journalism.

The basic ROTC program is placed on an elective basis. Since 1919, it has consisted of a required two-year and a voluntary two-year advanced program.


  Student life:
Women's hours are extended. Week night hours are now until midnight (except freshmen, 10:30 p.m.). Weekend hours for all women are extended until 1:00 a.m. on Friday and Saturday, and midnight on Sunday.

A comprehensive plan for protecting Iowa State students in case of nuclear attack is developed, with George Burnet as chairman of the Committee on Planning.

Enrollment at Iowa State reaches 10,000 students.
 

1963

  Academic life:

CIRAS, the Center for Industrial Research and Service, is founded, with a mission, "to enhance the performance of Iowa industry."

  Campus:

A new edition of "Campus Sketches" by Velma Wallace Rayness is published.

The Gables is torn down to make way for Buchanan Hall.
 

   Student life:

The IBM computer mixer is held.
 

1964

   Student life:

The ISU Players celebrated 50 years, having been created by Frederica Shattuck in 1914.

VEISHEA theme:  "Making of Our Nation"

   University:

C.Y. Stephens is killed in car crash. He has raised over $4.2 million for the ISU Center.
 

1965

   Campus:

Storms Hall, the first of the Towers Complex, is opened to 600 male students.

The Farm House is listed as a Registered National Historic Landmark.



   University:

One of the largest nuclear reactors in the nation dedicated to basic research, the Ames Laboratory "went critical" Feb. 17, 1965, completing a 4 year, $4.5 million construction project.

1966

  Academic life:

The first World Affairs Institute is held on campus, dealing with "The Problem of China."

The Cyclone Computer is dismantled after 10 years. The Cyclone was one of 9 non-commercial machines in its class, built during the initial post-war phase of computer development. It was built entirely by Iowa State personnel and students.

   Student life:

A no-hours policy for senior women and women over 21 goes into effect.

Enrollment stands at 15,000.
 

   University:

Annual giving to Iowa State totaled $475,106.
 

1967

  Academic life:

The Iowa State University Library is admitted as the 28th member of the Center of Research Libraries, now known as the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL). Membership is limited to institutions maintaining large research collections.

   Student life:

Co-ed Mary Ann Ebbing is named to the ISU Meat Judging Team.

   University:

The class of 1967 donates the nucleus of an art collection to the University, with the presentation of Maurice Lasansky's "Lady in Blue."

WOI begins broadcasting its television programs in color.

 

1968

  Academic life:

The College of Education is established.

   Athletics:

Black Athletes submit a protest letter, known as the Eight Grievances. Among their requests: Black coaches and personnel on the sports teams, the removal of coaches and trainers who would not recruit black athletes, and the term of Afro-American or black should be applied, but the term Negro should not.

Don Smith graduates and his record in basketball:
Most points in one game: 41 against Southern Cal
Most points in one season: 619
Most points in a career: 1,672
Most rebounds in one game: 24
Most rebounds in a season: 365
Most rebounds in a career: 1,025
 

   Campus:

The design for Hilton Coliseum is approved by the Board of Regents.

   Student life:

Grades are available to the parents of students, if they write the Office of Student Records.

   University:

A Story County grand jury report is published and notes the "frequent reports of student radicals and other activities using campus media to pulpiteer, sensationalize and otherwise promote illicit sex, drug use, draft evasion, defamation of our country and our leaders, demands the attention of this report." President Parks responds by noting this is an unfair and grossly distorted picture of Iowa State.

The Order of the Knoll is organized for alumni and friends.

 

1969

  Athletics:

Wrestlers win the NCAA tournament.

   Student life:

The first Black Cultural Affairs Week is held.

Co-eds move into Friley Hall.


   University:

Ira Schroeder, university carillonneur retires (1931-1969).

As part of a week-long concert series, the New York Philharmonic performs at the opening of C.Y. Stephens Auditorium.
 

1970

   Academic life:

The YWCA offers the first women's studies course to ISU students.

David Nicholas, a student in electrical engineering, develops an encoding process for the fax machine.

Wes Buchele in agricultural engineering is awarded a patent for a machine forming and handling large round bales of hay.
 

   Campus:

ISU names a building for George Washington Carver, and the Black Cultural Center on Welch Avenue is dedicated.

Cy-Ride is born, as the first buses transport students from Towers and University Village to central campus.


   Student life:

The Fifth Dimension performs two concerts.

New guest hours are approved for members of the opposite sex in the residence halls: Noon to 10 p.m., Sunday-Thursdays and from noon to 1 a.m. on Fridays and Saturdays.
 

   University:

ISU students hold a mass rally and strike to protest U.S. involvement in Cambodia, and also hold a memorial service for the students slain at Kent State. At VEISHEA, the parade also incorporates a "March of Concern" joined by faculty, students, and staff. President Parks speaks on campus, stating, "I am glad this rally is being held for peace. I know you are concerned, deeply concerned about what has happened at Kent State and recent developments in Southeast Asia. I am concerned, too. Bringing peace is the most important problem facing us. As president, I want to say you are going about it in the right way . . . If the university is not concerned with deep human problems such as bringing peace, then what should it be concerned with?" (ISU Daily)
 

1971

  Athletics:

Hilton Coliseum opens on Dec 2 with an Iowa State basketball win over Arizona, 71-54.

 

1972

 Campus:

Automobiles are blocked from central campus through electronic cross-bars.

   University:

The University Committee on Women is established.
 

1973

  Academic life:

A prairie planting is established in the area between Science I and Science II to serve as a demonstration area and outdoor learning laboratory.

 

1974

  Academic life:

The ISU Library's one millionth volume, Trattato della pittvra di Lionardo da Vinci, is purchased for the collection.

The Departments of Physical Education for Men and Women are combined, and Barbara Forker is named the first department head.

   Student life:

The Maintenance Shop opens in the Memorial Union. Through the years, the M-Shop hosts a broad range of bands performing all kinds of music, from jazz to rock to reggae.

 

 

Time line, 1975-2008