Literary Collections Guide

Abrams, Rochonne Weintraub, Papers, 1868-1996, undated.
Extent: 2.73 linear feet (6 document boxes).
Number: MS-303.
Description: Rochonne W. Abrams received her B.A. (1943) in English and Art History from Wellesley College and an M.A. (1967) in American Studies from Washington University. Her thesis was titled, "The Lewis and Clark Journals; Their Contribution to American Literature." From 1967-1973, Abrams was a teacher of English and Journalism at the Meramec Junior College and Visitation Academy; 1973-1975 an Assistant Editor for the Journals of Ocology, Rhinology, and Laryncology; and 1975-1979 a writer for the Washington University School of Medicine Office of Information. She also has written for the United Press International, the Missouri Botanical Garden, Chromalloy, and the American Red Cross. This collection contains manuscript drafts for Good Earthkeeping, a book devoted to women involved in ecology, as well as research notes, correspondence and printed materials. The essays provide personal background as well as career information. Included are: Lady Bird Johnson; Gene Stratton-Porter, author; Mary Hunter Austin, author; Rachel Carson, ecological author; Marjorie Stoneman Douglas, conservationist; Frances Hamerstrom, ornithologist; Ellen H. Swallow Richards, public health and sanitation activist and others.
Status: Processed.
Finding Aid: Online.


Adams Family, Papers, 1618-1976, undated.
Extent: 2.94 linear feet (7 document boxes).
Number: MS-010.
Description: The Adams Family Papers contain papers from numerous members of the Adams family, including materials from the women in the family. One member in particular, Mary Newbury Adams (1837-1901), was involved in the suffrage movement and encouraging women's education. She and her husband, Austin Adams, a young lawyer and teacher, lived in Dubuque, Iowa. Their home became a meeting place for intellectuals of the period (1860's through 1880's). In 1866, Mrs. Adams became interested in women's suffrage and did much to promote it through writing and speaking. The Adams Family Papers contains correspondence, writings, diaries, newspaper clippings, the family bible and biographical materials. The biographical materials include newspaper clippings, journals, and diaries of the family members. The writings included both prose and poetry on a variety of topics by a variety of members of the Adams family, and for some of the writings it is unclear who the author is. However, most of the writings are by Austin and Mary Adams.
Status: Processed.
Finding Aid: Online.


Butts, Albert Parks, Papers, 1973, undated.
Extent: 0.42 linear feet (1 document box).
Number: MS-185.
Description: Albert Parks Butts was a railroad conductor in Iowa for most of his career. He was a freight conductor between Rockwell City and Newton, a passenger conductor for Rockwell City, passenger conductor from Des Moines to Fort Dodge and then a freight conductor on the Webster City branch until his retirement in 1956 with over forty-seven years of service. After his retirement, Butts began writing about railroading. This collection (1973, n.d.) contains several manuscripts (many in draft form), most of them written by Albert Butts himself. The manuscripts recount tales of his childhood and adult years. In Iowa's Golden Age: The Passing of an Era, Butts includes memories of people and events during Butts' long career as an interurban conductor for the Fort Dodge, Des Moines and Southern railroad. West Bound: I Leave Home describes Butts' journey to Seattle in 1909 to obtain a job as a guard at the World Fair. However, on his way to Seattle, he stopped to visit his uncle in Iowa and stayed in the state and with the railroad. A Railroad Builder, R. B. Parks describes the career of Butts' uncle, Rextor, with whom he worked. Sabina Druschel Becker Kropf: A Calhoun County Pioneer, written for the Calhoun County Historical Society, is a history of Butts' wife, Sabina, and her family. Also included in the collection is Our Farm Life and Social, 1899 to 1909, which describes Butt's childhood.
Status: Processed.
Finding Aid: Online.


Errington, Paul, Papers, 1929-2008, undated.
Extent: 17.26 linear feet.
Number: RS 21/25/51.
Description: Naturalist and professor of zoology (1932-1962) at Iowa State University. Paul Lester Errington received a B.S. in 1930 from South Dakota State University and a Ph.D. in 1932 from the University of Wisconsin. Errington's research interests included food habits of avian and mammalian predators and the effects of prey on predator populations. Collection contains correspondence, articles, papers and stories, manuscripts and galleys of books, a bibliography of his writings, and research and lecture notes pertaining to vertebrate ecology and population dynamics. Professional organizations documented include the American Ornithologists' Union, the Iowa State Conservation Commission, the Ecology Society, the National Audubon Society, and the Wildlife Society. Collection contains manuscripts and galleys for four books by Errington: Muskrats and Marsh Management (1961), Muskrat Populations (1963), Of Men and Marshes (1957), and Predation and Life (1967). Correspondents include Durward L. Allen, H. G. Andrewartha, Marston Bates, F. S. Bodenheimer, Walter J. Breckenridge, Kai Curry-Lindahl, Frank Darling, Charles Elton, Ira Gabrielson, Mr. and Mrs. Frederick N. Hamerstrom, Jr., Joe Hickey, David Lack, A. Starker Leopold, Aldo Leopold, G. W. Malaher, W. L. McAtee, Margaret M. Nice, Lauri Siivonen, Herbert L. Stoddard, and William Vogt.
Status: Processed.
Finding Aid: Online.


Feinberg, Leonard and Lillian, Papers, 1935-2008, undated.
Extent: 9.0 linear feet (19 document boxes and 1 map case folder).
Number: RS 13/10/56.
Description: Dr. Feinberg joined the Iowa State College (University) faculty as Assistant Professor (1946-1950), and was promoted to Associate Professor (1950-1957), and Professor (1957-1975). Dr. Feinberg became Distinguished Professor of English (1975-1981). His main area of research included satire and humor. Lilian Okner received an A.B. (1940) in English from the University of Illinois, and an M.S. (1967) in Journalism and Mass Communications from Iowa State University. Before coming to Iowa State, Feinberg worked as a resident investigator (market researcher) (1939-1940) for J. Walter Thompson, an advertising and direct mail copywriter (1936-1938) for Goldblatt Bros. Department Store, a reporter (1941-1943) at the Champaign-Urbana Courier, publicity director and copywriter (1943) for R. H. White Department Store (Boston), and as an assistant (1944-1946) in the English department at the University of Illinois. Professor Feinberg joined the Iowa State College (University) faculty as an instructor (1952-1967) in the Department of English, and was promoted to Assistant Professor (1967-1975) and Associate Professor (1975-1981). Her research interests included national and international business communication. Feinberg wrote Applied Business Communications (1982). Leonard and Lilian Feinberg were married in Chicago, Illinois in 1938. The collection primarily contains Dr. Leonard Feinberg's research and writings including Introduction to Satire (1967), Asian Laughter (1971), The Secret of Humor (1978), and Satire – It's Nature and Method. A highlight of the collection are Dr. Feinberg's research notes of international examples of satire and humor, ranging from primitive and ancient to modern cultures. The papers also includes Lilian's research project on communication and placement of Iowa State University students for employment (map case), writings on her and Leonard's travels and business communication, and opinion pieces in the Ames Tribune.
Status: Processed.
Finding Aid: Online.


Hawkins, Cora Frear, Buggies, Blizzards and Babies Manuscript, 1971.
Extent: 0.42 linear feet (1 document box).
Number: MS-228.
Description: Author Cora Frear Hawkins was born in Sloan, Iowa and was educated at Morningside College, where she graduated in 1907. She married Lon Hawkins in 1908 and they then lived in Washington, D.C. After her husband's retirement from the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture in 1942, they resided on a fruit farm near Eugene, Oregon. This collection contains a typed manuscript of Hawkin's book, "Buggies, Blizzards, and Babies," published by the Iowa State University Press in 1971. Hawkins recounts her experiences of numerous travels in Iowa with her father, a country doctor who began practicing in 1882.
Status: Processed.
Finding Aid: Online.


Hogrefe, Pearl, Papers, 1914-1977.
Extent: 1.8 linear feet (6 document boxes).
Number: RS 13/10/52.
Description: Pearl Hogrefe (1889-1977) received an A.B. (1910) from Southwestern College in Winfield, Kansas, her M.A. (1913) from the University of Kansas and her Ph.D. (1927) from the University of Chicago. Hogrefe was Head (1919-1921) of English at Missouri Wesleyan College, taught (1921-1924) at the Iowa State Teachers College (University of Northern Iowa), and taught at Louisiana Polytechnic Institute as Professor and Head (1928-1931) of the Department of English. In 1931, Hogrefe became an Associate Professor (1931-1944) at Iowa State College (University) and was later promoted to Professor (1944-1971). Her research and publication interests concentrate on the English Renaissance and the writing of fiction. Hogrefe has written seven major articles and ten books, including Tudor Women: Commoners and Queens. The collection contains biographical information, class notes, publications, and correspondence. Much of the correspondence relates to her research and publishing efforts. Hogrefe's publications focus mostly on the writing of fiction and the English Renaissance, including articles about Thomas More and Thomas Elyot. In addition the papers include galley proofs, notes, and manuscripts on Tudor Women: Commoners and Queens (1975; call number: HQ1596 .H63) and on Women of Action in Tudor England (1977; call number: HQ1595.A3 H63).
Status: Processed.
Finding Aid: Online.


Lewis, Faye Cashatt, Papers, 1972.
Extent: 0.21 linear feet (1 half-document box).
Number: MS-242.
Description: Author and doctor Faye Cashatt Lewis was born in Carroll County, Iowa and migrated in childhood to South Dakota. She graduated from the University of South Dakota, Vermillion, and then received her degree in medicine from Washington University in St. Louis. She practiced medicine for a number of years (1943-1969) and also published a number of books about her experiences. This collection contains a typescript, edited copy of Lewis' book, Nothing to Make a Shadow, published by the Iowa State University Press in 1972. The author describes her family's move to the South Dakota prairie and their adventures there.
Status: Processed.
Finding Aid: Online.


Lorch, Frederick William, Papers, 1857-1967, undated.
Extent: 6.3 linear feet (15 document boxes).
Number: RS 13/10/54.
Description: Frederick William Lorch, born in Germany, received his B.A. (1918) from Knox College and his M.A. and Ph.D from the University of Iowa. He joined the Iowa State College (University) staff in 1921 as an instructor in English, was promoted through the faculty ranks, and served as Department Head (1942-1959). Lorch was the author of more than 30 scholarly articles and a national authority on some aspects of Mark Twain's career. He edited several textbooks, including The Trouble Begins at Eight-Mark Twain's Lecture Tours (call no. PS1338.L6). This work was published posthumously and won the Iowa State University Press Annual Award for the most outstanding manuscript by an Iowa author. This collection contains biographical information, professional correspondence, notes relating to his teaching and research on various literary figures, and research and notes relating to the career of Mark Twain. In addition, there are texts from tour lectures, materials relating to Lorch's speeches and other published articles and reviews, as well as Twain-related ephemera.
Status: Processed.
Finding Aid: Online.


McClelland, Dorothea, Papers, 1890-1990, undated.
Extent: 5.05 linear feet (11 document boxes, 2 half-document boxes, and 1 oversized box).
Number: MS-266.
Description: Dorothea Bryan was born in Japan, where her parents were missionaries. She returned to the United States when she was in the seventh grade and lived in Wooster, Ohio. There attended the College of Wooster for two years and then transferred to The Ohio State University to complete her undergraduate degree. She married Iowa State College (University) professor John B. McClelland in 1923. After she had moved to the United States, McClelland became interested in reading Lafcadio Hearn's writings because they reminded her of Japan. Her interest in Hearn's books led her to a study of the biographies written about him. During her study, she found that there were good things about each biography, but there were also errors in each one. The materials in this collection were gathered in the course of her research. The contains artwork, greeting cards, magazines, maps, microfilm, news clippings in Japanese and in English regarding Lafcadio Hearn and Japanese life and culture, photographs, postcards, research notebooks, stenographer's notebooks, and travel brochures. The majority of the collection is made up of McClelland's research notebooks.
Status: Processed.
Finding Aid: Online.

 


Nourse, Laura A. Sunderlin, Papers, circa 1890s.

Extent: 0.21 linear feet (1 half-document box).
Number: MS-139.
Description: Author Laura A. Sunderlin Nourse was born in 1836 at Independence, NY. She began writing as a child and married Samuel Sunderlin in 1855. They settled in Clinton, Iowa, where she and her husband became interested in the "science of life and immortality." She published a book of poems and prose in 1876 (Pencilings from Immortality) and published articles in several newspapers. After the death of her husband in 1886, she married Dr. William Nourse and moved to Moline, Illinois. This collection contains biographical information and drafts of Nourse's work, Lyric of Life. Included in the collection are a first and second draft and a bound author's edition (1892).
Status: Processed.
Finding Aid: Online.

 


Runkel, Sylvan, Papers, 1925-1998, undated.
Extent: 18.2 linear feet (41 manuscript boxes and 1 oversized box).
Number: MS-619.
Description: Sylvan Thomas Runkel received his B.S. (1930) in Forestry from Iowa State College (University). He worked as a forester in various capacities including as an extension forester and a forest type mapper until 1933 when he was appointed superintendent of the first Civilian Conservation Corps camp in Iowa, at Albia. In 1934 Runkel began his tenure with the United States Soil Conservation Service (SCS) as a forester technician, becoming a forester and conservationist in 1939. In 1947 Runkel rejoined the SCS in Ottumwa, Iowa as a soil conservationist, forester, and biologist. In 1952 he was transferred to Des Moines and became the State Biologist. He was appointed by the Governor to the State Preserves Board in 1969 and served for ten years, two as chairman. After his retirement from the SCS in 1972 Runkel drafted four environmental impact statements for Iowa Watershed projects and co-authored five books: Wildflowers of the Iowa Woodlands (1987), Wildflowers of the Illinois Woodlands (1994), Wildflowers of the Indiana Woodlands (1994, with Alvin F. Bull), Wildflowers of the Tallgrass Prairie: the upper Midwest (1989)and Wildflowers and other plants of Iowa wetlands (1999, with Dean M. Roosa). Much of the collection reflects his activities after 1972, including the records from the five books he co-authored as well as the four extensive Watershed studies he conducted on a contract basis after leaving the SCS. In addition to more formal correspondence and other records, the collection also contains a substantial amount of often incomplete notes and writings that illuminate Runkel's perspective on several topics, including the relationship between man and nature.
Status: Processed.
Finding Aid: Online.


Wilson, Margaret, Papers, 1923, undated.
Extent: 0.63 linear feet (1 document box and 1 half document box).
Number: MS-160.
Description: Author and missionary Margaret Wilson was born in Traer, Iowa. Her family later moved to Chicago, Illinois. She received an Associate degree (1903) and a B.Phil. (1904) from the University of Chicago. In 1904 Wilson became a missionary for the United Presbyterian Church of North America and she served in the Punjab area of India. Due to ill health, she resigned in 1916 and then attended divinity school and also taught high school, while writing short stories. After her marriage to George Douglas Wilson in 1923, Wilson began publishing novels, several of which received critical acclaim. The Able McLaughlins received the Harper Prize in 1923 and the Pulitzer Prize in 1924. This collection contains copies of Wilson's first novel, The Able McLaughlins, the Kenworthys, and an unnamed novel. Also included is biographical information and letters from Harper and Brothers.
Status: Processed.
Finding Aid: Online.